SPRINGFIELD'S SCULPTURES,            Carl and Roberta Volkmann
MONUMENTS, AND PLAQUES              cvolk@aol.com
www.arcadiapublishing.com
Oak Ridge Cemetery
JUDGE SAMUEL H. TREAT
The grave site in Oak Ridge Cemetery of Judge Samuel Hubbel Treat
(1811 to 1887) was finally appropriately marked with the dedication
of a striking marble obelisk on June 20, 2008.  The first Illinois judge
to serve in the circuit, supreme, and federal court systems, Judge
Treat’s remarkable career spanned just over 48 years.  Abraham
Lincoln and Judge Treat enjoyed a close personal and professional
relationship.  Both men were admitted to the bar on December 3,
1839 (along with Stephen Douglas).  Treat heard Lincoln argue 870
cases during the nine years he presided over the 8th circuit court,
162 Lincoln cases in the 14 years he was on the Illinois Supreme
Court, and at least 136 cases during the 32 years he sat as a federal
judge on the Southern District Court.  Records also indicate that the
two men were frequent chess opponents.
Since Judge Treat was a widower with no children, the
administrator of his estate was instructed to expend no
more than $200 for a tombstone.  That tombstone never
materialized.  On the recommendation of Judge Richard Mills
of the United State District Court, the Illinois State Bar
Association determined in 2005 that this distinguished
Illinois jurist must be acknowledged with an appropriate
monument.  The Illinois Bar Foundation spearheaded a
campaign to raise funds, and through special benefits and
donations, they collected $15,885, surpassing the goal of
$14,000. Other organizations contributing to the effort
include: the Abraham Lincoln Association, the Bar Association for the Central and
Southern Federal Districts of Illinois, the Illinois Supreme Court Legal Historical Society,
and the Sangamon County Bar Association.

The June 20, 2008, dedication of the monument occurred one day before the 197th
anniversary of Judge Treat’s birth and 121 years after his death.  Speakers for the
event were Judge Mills and Daniel W. Stowell, director of the Papers of Abraham
Lincoln Project.  Dean Robert Brodie offered the invocation and benediction, and David
B. Sosin presided.  Judge Mills concluded his remarks by saying, “Here today we pay
final homage to a remarkable jurist on Mr. Lincoln’s prairie—the Honorable Samuel
Hubbel Treat.  Godspeed.”